MISSION

Cutaneous lymphomas are rare subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Although these cancers start in the skin, they originate in the white blood cells, called lymphocytes thus classifying them as blood cancers. The two main types of lymphocytes that can develop into cutaneous lymphoma cancers, the T-cells and B-cells, with the former being the most common. The EORTC Group works with the pharmaceutical industry and its Translational Researchers to find targeted treatments for patients affected by this cancer type. They also actively engage in research to identify the prognosis and predicting factors of the disease.

PRACTICE CHANGING RESEARCH

  • Cutaneous Lymphoma Group

    Guidelines for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome (MF/SS).

    The EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force together with the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas and the U.S. Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, updated their consensus recommendations for clinical trials investigating Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS), types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These guidelines have facilitated collaboration among investigators and collation of data from clinical trials involving patients with MF or SS.

  • Cutaneous Lymphoma Group

    Review of treatments for primary CD30+ LPDs.

    The EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force together with the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas and the U.S.A Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium Primary, published their consensus recommendations on cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30+ LPDs), the second most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. This was the first systematic review of response rates to treatment, recurrence rates, and outcomes for CD30+ LPDs leading to better staging, treatment, and clinical endpoints.

  • Cutaneous Lymphoma Group

    Guidelines for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome (MF/SS).

    The EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force updated its 2011 consensus recommendations on Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS), types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The recommendations reiterated that skin-directed therapies are still the most appropriate for early stage MF but suggested that there must be more development and investigation in controlled clinical trials of treatment options based in the molecular pathology of MF and SS.

  • Jun-11
  • Oct-11
  • May-17

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

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